Peddling in semolina

Pédaler dans la semoule which is a french saying meaning, having trouble doing something.

And for the past two years we’ve had trouble getting our French house extension completed (something you will be aware of if you’ve been reading my blog). But on the Monday after we arrived it felt like the semolina was being thinned down by water and positively washed out of the bowl and down the sink.

There was some rain on that Monday but this didn’t dampen our spirits. 8.30am the tiler arrived and began work on the sitting room floor. Laying the tiles we had purchased back in October last year. 10am and the joiner arrived to fit the staircase rail (not fitted by our previous and now fired builder). At 11.30am our Maisons du Monde bed was delivered and by 12.10 Paul and Callum had put it together. So now no more sleeping on a mattress on the floor. Yea!By The next day the tiling was complete and only the grout to do on the following day which was Wednesday. And on Wednesday we had a lovely visit from the Mais family and spent an entertaining evening at the Eymet night market. At the end of this first week on the Saturday we ordered a Candy fridge freezer from Pro & Cie. Not keen on the idea of two fridges in the kitchen but there’s just not enough room in the small one for cheese, drinks and vegetables.

So great achievements made by the end of week one and definitely no more peddling in semolina.

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A week in Cauterets, Haute Pyrenees 

A week in Cauterets, Haute Pyrenees ⛷🏂🎿Missed the Mais.

This was a lovely half term week skiing. Didn’t think I could manage all week but I did. It would have been nice to do the spa and Loudes but there just wasn’t the time. Our skiing has progressed really well. Particularly Callum’s snowboarding 🏂. We’ve filmed him on a red run for his GCSE PE and he’s also used his GoPro to film himself.

Cauterets is a really gorgeous place to stay – really busy all day long so a great atmosphere, interesting architecture.  There were lots of Eataries BUT as usual for me as a vegetarian, food was an issue, unless I was happy eating pizza all week – and most were booked and/or had two sittings so we booked one night and most nights just wandered till we found one with a table free. The evening we were going to venture to the cinema, La La land was cancelled.  However, there were lots of things to do, if you have the energy after a days skiing.  A swimming pool, spa (x 2), salle de jeux (mini arcade with pool tables / air hockey / pin ball etc) and several play areas for younger children.

Hotel Edleweiss, where we stayed was a family run hotel – the mother and father had very little English but one of the sons spoke really good English and as it happened another family staying at the same time could also speak very good English too.  The cousin of the hotel owner even bought Grandma a gift when we left! On the down side the restaurant had no choice, only plat du jour. No bar and the sitting area was for a max of 10 people. We did manage to get tea, coffee and wine every night delivered to this area. Not the same as having a huge open fire and views of the mountains as we have had in previous hotels.

Skiing – a bit daunting  when we first got up to the top! Blinded by the sun and what appeared to be very steep runs. Even my son, who is very brave, was a bit overawed to start with but ended up loving the steep slopes.  The food at the top was fine – there was a restaurant (but we tended to eat sandwiches / hot dogs / chips / waffles and crepes from the bar) it was busy but we always found a table and never queued for more than 10 minutes and that was a one off.

Our lessons this year were “ok” – the instructor just said that we could clearly ski and knew the techniques but just needed confidence (more of a psychology session!). He wanted to take us up to the top but I was too nervous – he said we would be fine!

Queues were horrendous – 45 minutes (at its’ worst) for a turn on the “source” pommel. However queues to go to the top on the proper lifts were actually very quick and if from 8am till 10am the queues were manageable.  But it was half term school holidays in France too.

The basic small blue runs (3 choices of routes down) we started on were a bit of a pain because of “moguls” that were created every day by the sheer number of skiers going through one crossroad – and then bumps just after (on two of the options) where you would take off and needed good balance to get through – these didn’t exist at the start of the day but were very difficult to handle at the end of the day. Also hard because of the number of people who congregated at this point / slowed down to get through them.

Tapis wasn’t too bad – reasonable for warming up / cooling down and queues easier to handle – lots of under 8’s to slalom around!

I lacked confidence so stuck to the green and blue runs. The instructor took us on a steep part of a blue run and taught us how to slide so we would know how to get past steeper bits we didn’t feel like skiing! However, I fell and that knocked my confidence.  Quelle wimp!

The weather was brilliant, although no new snow.

Oh I forgot – there was an avalanche but fortunately not on the pistes. My son was on the chair lift and saw it all but Paul and I were having a coffee so missed it!

Really looking forward to being en France again at Easter.  6 weeks to go!

Skiing in Saint Lary

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Trip to Troncens and beyond. Super trip this Christmas to see the family in Troncens near Marciac. Christmas trees in Marciac.  Gutted that our favourite restaurant in Marciac was closed.  Tried another “boff”. Cold food not good. From here it was on to Saint Lary 1700 in the Pyrenees to do a spot of skiing and celebrate Christmas.  Really impressed with the Hotel Christiania, run by a lovely friendly Belgian couple. Stunning views of the mountains from the bedrooms.

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Once we were all suited and booted it was off to the slopes.

imageIn France Christmas presents are traditionally given on Christmas Eve. It was really charming to see all the parents placing presents around the Christmas tree for their children while they were distracted by watching a DVD in the basement. We stuck to our Own tradition of the 25th but loved every minute of Christmas Eve celebrations.

image After a hard day skiing or discovering Saint Lary village, it was time for Baileys, scrabble, good food and family time.

image Bonne Année, looking forward to 2015.

 

 

 

 

La neige

Fantastic skiing at Tournaboup just up from Barèges in the French Pyrenees. We stayed in Luz St Sauveur in a wonderful family run hotel called Le Montaigu. imagePerfect weather.  No lower than minus 4 and sometimes plus 4. Perfect company. Great hotel. Great dog! The children won’t forget Aslan.imageWhat more could you ask for. Well I’ll tell you. Shins and calves that don’t ache. These are the culprits. imageBoots that clamp around your feet and shins like a vice and force your legs into an unnatural forward slant that encourages you to keep your body weight over your toes which is, apparently, perfect for skiing. However, with the help of Michele, our ski instructor, it’s all worth it.  We can ski.image I just need to master getting off the ski lift. Talking of ski lifts I was so proud of Cal taking the lift to do his first mountain run. imageLuke and Evan made a fantastic snowman. imageimageCal and Luke enjoyed chewing the fat. imageAnd the scenery was stunning. Unfortunately I didn’t take any pictures high up in the mountains so this will have to do.imageBonne année 2014 from Au Carotte chez Mais.