Leaking shower

So as you may have already picked up from earlier posts, we have had a disappointing relationship with the builder of our extension in France. The contract for the work was signed in August 2014 and the work is yet to be completed. Our relationship with him has now completely broken down. Anyway I digress as this post is really about yet another issue that he has left us with. In this case a leaking shower and a shower that only supplies hot water. We highlighted this problem to him last year and several times since but nothing has ever been done about it. So this time when we turned on the water we awoke the next morning to a puddle. It’s not easy to get an emergency plumber in France. So we decided to having a go at solving the problem ourselves. 

First we sadly needed to saw through the perfect plasterboard on our landing. This then revealed the pipework for the newly fitted shower. The hot water feed turned out to be the offending pipe. So we turned off the water, armed ourselves with some cups and then unscrewed it. The cardboard washer   had all but disintergrated. Problem solved, or so we thought. We can hot foot it to the local Tridome and get a new one. Meanwhile, there was an almighty gush of water. Screams all round and buckets grabbed from downstairs. Towels thrown down. What the hell was that. It stopped but made another watery mess. New washers purchased from Tridome and fitted and we thought we’d solved the problem completely. Sadly not, so we’ve had to turn the water off. So annoying. We probably do need a plumber after all, unless anyone has any suggestions?

The other problem we’ve encounter associated with the thermostatic shower that we’ve purchased, is that the thermostat appears not to be working as it only emits bowling hot water. So no showers anyway. Any thoughts on what might be going on here?

Open garden, South West France😍

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First lunch at B’s.

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Then to Loubens where one of B’s friends lives. She has a lovely Girondaise farm house that is on the market at moment.  House near Loubens

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Super place to check out which plants will grow in this part of France and for garden design ideas. We will return to check it out at the start of the season. At the moment it is so dry and parched. Still looking good

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I always think it’s lovely to stumble across a hidden oasis and treasures within a garden. Hydrangeas to die for and lots of hidden object d’art to stimulate the senses.image

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To get all the details about open gardens in France go to:

http://rendezvousauxjardins.culturecommunication.gouv.fr/

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Aaaarrrrgghhh, blasted wifi down AGAIN😡😡😡

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OK, so I’m starting with grapes. Not sure why, just had a lot of time to take snap shots of the garden as we just couldn’t get a decent WiFi signal at the beginning of this week. Whaaaaaats up!  So now we’re back in Blighty I’m updating my blog.  This was the picture on our return to LBA early on Thursday morning.  What no sun!  We’d got so used to 30 degrees that 12 just didn’t cut it.

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Anyway back to the building work.

You need the right tools!  This magnificent red contraption (a dry wall lifter) is a must when you are fixing plasterboard to the ceiling.  Hubby and I were chuckling, just imagining ourselves doing this job without the correct tools.  I know there would be lots of cursing and blaming each other!!!  Just as well our builder is putting the ceilings up.

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This would have been hubby and me with the 4 x 4 propping up the board and one of us having a very achy arm/shoulder the next day.

imageUpstairs we now have a toilet and the shower tray has been installed.  We’ve also  purchased the shower, awaiting installation, and the sink/unit which has been installed temporarily, this we bought from IKEA last year.

We’ve now chosen the tiles for the en-suite, together with the wooden floor for the bedroom but because of the French holidays, we won’t be able to order these until September, so who knows when they’ll be fitted😦

Downstairs we’re going for a traditional French style tile and not sure of the pattern yet. Again this won’t be available until September. It would seem sensible then, to wait and decide on the covered area and patio tiles when these have been laid.

Watch this space👀

Rome ne s’est pas bâtie dans un jour

We’ve arrived to gorgeous weather.  It’s going to take us some time to acclimatise, although we have been having a bit of a heat wave back home in Blighty too.  It’s all hands on deck today with the building work as we have friends coming to stay for a week on Thursday.  We need to be sleeping in the new bedroom in the extension.  So it’s a case of the loo being fitted now, painting being done and then a temporary wash basin going in as well.

We’ve been madly mowing and strimming.  My son spent most of the first day we were here mowing the lawn as he was so board.  The minute we arrive he’s like, “what are we going to do” and we are like “we’ve just driven for 18 hours we want to snooze and do nothing”.  Bit of a miss-match going on.

All the plants that I put in at Easter have died and gone from this:

To this:

We will probably have to invest in some sort of watering system if we want to plant again or make sure we plant in October/November.  Although, the garden centres don’t have the same selection of plants at that time of year.

The exterior of the extension is now completed apart from the crépi.  The interior is still a work in progress.

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Paul is enjoying the new view from the bedroom window.

Now we need to choose flooring and tiles.  Allons-y!

La progression

 1st June and the windows are being put in.

 

17th June, work on the interior begins, starting with the loft area.

22nd June and the interior wall battens/studwork go in.

9th July, first fix electrics done and  now for insulation and plaster board.

We hope to see more progress when we arrive this Saturday:)

Quatre différentes formes de maisons dans Le Lot et Garonne

Back in the UK and it’s not long before my thoughts return to France, and of course our little house. Last week I came across a new Chanel 4 program called “Escape to the Château”. In the program a couple are seen purchasing a chateau for €250,000 and attempting to restore it for £30,000. What a joke😫, in my experience, any type of building work in France is really expensive. My nephew is in the process updating his pool and tells me he wont get much change out of that amount.  From what I know of our extension costs, I’m confident that you can purchase a property much cheaper than you could have it newly built.  However, having said that once you have chosen and purchased your French home it becomes, somewhat of a baby that you want to nurture and develop.  Or, maybe that’s just me!!!!!!!!!!

So I’m going to share with you, four different types of properties you can purchase in our department of the Lot et Garonne, from newly built bungalows to grand châteaux.

Our house is a very small modern bungalow, plain and simple. But as my readers know it is in the process of getting a make-over through the addition of a new pigeonnier.

For many young working French families in our area the modern bungalow is the property of choice if they decide to branch out away from the rural family home. They are relatively cheap to build, well insulated and therefore cheap to run. Some are built as part of a small group of similar properties called a lotissement. On their own, like ours is, they can sometimes be referred to as a villa d’architecte.  Much more exotic title than bungalow.  However, any contemporary villa built in the last 50 years often has this title.  They can look like a box or take on a weird angular appearance.   Now if you’d asked me before we began our search for a French property, what my ideal would be, it certainly wouldn’t have been a modern one. But we fell for this one which was built as a gite in the grounds of a larger newly built home. It has a wonderful view over grape vines and prune trees beyond.

And it’s on mains drainage and not the dreaded fosse septique with all of its rules and regulations.  I know most of France cope perfectly well with these poo removers but I’m afraid from our experience of looking at some of the older properties quite frankly they send shivers down my spine. ~Anyway, we chose modern……. but what else is on offer?

Villereal farmhouse

What’s not to love about an old French farmhouse (Fermette/Ferm)? Yes, I swoon too. Crepis free pierre stone and the ubiquitous Wisteria gently caressing the shutters and front door.

And, I doff my hat to anyone who can (has the balls to) turn this …..

needs renovation

into this……..

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I adore the genoise roof line, the huge fire places and, of course, the old well in the garden. But what about being lady or gentleman of the manor. The maison de maître…

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The master’s house or maison de maître has a symmetrical façade with a central front door.  Many built in the 18th or 19th century were the home of the squire or minor landowner of the area.  They are not unique to the Lot et Garonne or Aquitaine region of France and they can be found all over France.  They are known for their formal and practical layout. They have high ceilings and each floor will often have four main rooms with the ground-floor reception rooms opening off a central entrance hall.

These houses were a status symbol and today, the larger ones are often incorrectly referred to as châteaux.  The owners, who will have had land, will have made their living from agricultural rent.  Following the French Revolution the maison de maître became the home for gentlemen farmers and vintners.

And of course, we can all imagine ourselves owners of a French château.  Can’t we?

For example this one is only 395,000 Euros.

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This one is 595,000 Euros.

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And none of these are more than a 1,000,000 Euros

The grandeur, the elegance, the splendour.  A château is impressive, in appearance and style.  It can be a country residence surrounded by an estate or a moated, turreted seat with royal connections.  The word chateau or “chastel” dates to the 18th-century, therefore a chateau is not strictly speaking a ‘castle’. A castle would be a château fort. Castles were built in order to defend those contained within their walls and date back to much earlier times, as far back as the 10th century or earlier.  A castle would have battlements, fortified walls and arrow slits, being built to withstand a siege.

After the Revolution, the term came to describe any spectacular country house with towers set in its own landscaped grounds. They can often look like the maison de maître,  elegant with symmetrical facades, but with greater dimensions, land, elaborate stonework and cornicing. A château may also be a winemaking property, of which there are many close to us around Bordeaux.

In the meantime I’ll make do with my own little tower!

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